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Gays blow ad ride hard knobs

opinion

As the Indian-Pacific train slogged its way along the desert, stopping every couple of hours to pull aside to allow a freight train to pass on the single track, the flat, vast scenery remained unchanged until a little after one in the afternoon when miraculously trees—as in real trees, not scraggly, overgrown bushes—started to appear. Not long after that we began to see sheep grazing on brown grass Gays blow vast, arid pastures and then a paved road, a car, a pick up truck and,  voila, a house.

We were about a hundred miles from Perth, and small villages started to pop up as Gays blow ride got closer to the city. In an hour we were passing through typical suburbs of modest, ranch style homes and at 3: Our separate way began with a bus tour of the city arranged by Indian-Pacific. We were joined by 20 or so of the departing plus passengers and spent the better part of three hours hard knobs the downtown area and some of the adjoining suburbs.

Somewhere I had gotten the idea that Perth was a rinky-dink, small town on the coast. In fact the city is a thriving metropolis with sparkling skyscrapers making it feel more like a Sydney or a Melbourne rather than an Adelaide. With a population of over two million it is pretty much tied with Brisbane as the third biggest city in Australia.

The balance is—you guessed it—the Outback. By all accounts that I have read, Perth is the most remote and isolated, large city on the entire planet. What stands out most about Perthhowever, is its "ride hard knobs" riverfront. The city is not a port. It is located about 10 miles from the Indian Ocean where the neighboring town of Fremantle serves as the  port city. Perth is located on the Swan River, which is the tidal estuary that flows through Fremantle and into the Indian Ocean.

When the river reaches Perth, it opens up into a   bay, which in some places is more than a mile wide. It is the perfect location for small Gays blow ad ride hard knobs racing, which was happening all over the place in various spots.

Perth is also different from the East Coast cities in terms of climate. It has a rainy season from March through July, which is responsible for producing about 39 inches of precipitation, about what we get in Washington.

The balance of the year is dry with clear skies most of the time and moderate temperatures.

The hot day we encountered "Gays blow ad ride hard knobs" something of an anomaly. Our bus ride took us past a major university and then to a large park on a steep hill overlooking the river with stunning views of the Perth skyline. We then wound our way through fancy, single family neighborhoods where all the houses were worth millions of dollars—all guides seem to be obsessed with how high housing values are—and then to two beach areas.

Since it knobs Saturday afternoon and unusually hot with 95 degree temperatures, the beeches were packed with sun bathers and surfers. At six the driver started dropping people off at various downtown hotels and went out of his way to deposit us at a bed and breakfast about three miles from the downtown area. There were two highlights of the Perth experience.

The first was spending virtually the entire day, the day after we arrived, at a beautiful beach in Fremantle where we sat on the grass under the shade of a large tree in a manicured park area alongside the public beach. Embry got her swim in the Indian Ocean, and I just chilled out since I still have not completely recovered from the respiratory virus.

Truth be told, we were both pretty exhausted by this time. We  left Washington on December 22 and have traveled God knows how many miles and through eleven time zones, using almost every mode of transportation. I could not ride hard thinking, time for the Gays blow to head for the barn.

We did take a brief walk around Fremantle and stopped for a beer at a seaside bar, packed with Millennials.

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